Splice Creek Methodist (1870-after 1987)

West of Lupus - 1/2 mile west of Hwy 179 on banks of Splice Creek

 

Pictures by Jim Martin, 1998

On file at the Moniteau County Historical Society

 

History of Jamestown, Missouri 1837-1987:

 

The Splice Creek United Methodist Church is located in Moniteau County on the banks of Splice Creek, from which it derived its name, one half mile off of Highway 179, west of Lupus.

 

The building was erected in 1870 by Edmond Snodgrass and his son, John, along with voluntary help from men in the community.

 

The deed to the land was made August 5, 1871, by Thomas and Rebecca Stephens.

 

The first pastor was Rev. Hogan. Another one of the earliest pastors was Rev. Isaac Goode. Jobe Hampton, Henry Hampton, and Kemp Stephens were the first trustees.

 

On August 8, 1870, William Pettigrew deeded a plot of ground to the church for a cemetery. It is just a short distance east of the church on a hillside. Many of the early settlers were buried there. There have been no recent burials.

 

William Pettigrew's wife, Julia Ann, was a charter member of the church. Another recorded member which dates back to 1872 was Mrs. John (Jenny Renfrow) Blank.

 

Unfortunately the membership records of the first two years were destroyed by fire. Among the earliest members were Mr. and Mrs. Marion Marshall, Mr. and Mrs. Job Hampton, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hampton, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Miller, Mrs. Clabe Stevens, Thomas Boone Don Carlos, a former member, is now (in 1987) a minister of the Assembly of God Church in the state of California. Several members of the Hampton family are ministers.

 

Many heart warming revivals were held at the church, some inside and some as brush arbor and tent meetings. In 1920 a tent meeting that attracted a large crowd, was led by Rev. Orr. In 1930, there was a brush arbor meeting with Rev. Ragan and other pastors assisting. The arbor was built just south of the church with rough wooden benches and lanterns hung for light. Lanterns were used in the church itself until it was wired for electricity in 1940. Folks came from miles around to the meetings. Some walked and others came by large farm wagons. Then came the buggy and surry days. Buried in the large oak trees of the church yard are spikes and horse shoes used for hitching the horses during church services.

 

The first pastor to serve the church that owned a car was Rev. C F Proyer in 1918.

 

In the earlier days of revival meetings several Negroes of the community attended the meetings. The late Elzie Patterson was janitor of the church for a few years and, on one occasion, when he went to clean he found a donation left from a visitor. He put the money in the Bible that lay on the table. He told the members of the congregation, "I thought it would be a pretty mean person that would steal out of the Bible."

 

The last revival held at the church was led by Jerry Brinegar in 1967. It was well attended each night.

 

During the depression of 1930 times were very trying for the little congregation but the budget was always met.

 

The most recent pastors of the church were Rev. Troy Gardner, Rev. Jim Stone, and our present (1987) pastor, Rev. Russell Standlee.

 

The Little Church in the Wildwood, as often called, is very dear to its members now, as it is with many past members who have since left the church.

 

From an article in the California Democrat in 1970; written by Mrs. Frank Oerly and Mrs. Wm. Larimore:

Splice Creek Church 1870-1970

The Splice Creek United Methodist Church is located in Moniteau County and is nestled low in a valley on the shady banks of Splice Creek, from which the church derived its name.

 

How old the congregation is, has not been established. The church building was erected in 1870 by Edmond Snodgrass and his son, John, with voluntary help from men and boys in the community. The plastering was done by Sidle Boldwin. The deed to the land was made on August 5, 1871 by Thomas and Rebecca Stephens. The first pastor was a Rev. Hogan, and also, one of the earliest pastors was Isaac Goode.The first trustees were Job Hampton, Henry Hampton and Kemp Stephens.

 

On August 9, 1870, William Pettigrew deeded a plot of land to the church for a cemetery. It is located just a short distance east of the church on a quiet, shady hill. Many of the early pioneer people are buried there, but there have been no burials in this cemetery for many years.

 

William Pettigrew's wife, Julia Ann, was a charter member of the church. Earliest recorded member in an 1872 record was Mrs. (John) Jenny Renfrow Blank. Unfortunately, the membership records of the first two years were destroyed by fire.

 

The exerior of the church remains the same as when it was built, and the interior remained the same for many years. The original wood post in the center of the church floor to support the ceiling has been partially removed and replaced with a steel support. The top of the post still remains intact. The floor joists are of native timber, hewed by hand on one side which the floor is laid on. The joists still carry most of the original tree bark on them.

 

The first chairs and pews were home-made, and they were used until 1935, when they were replaced with the present chairs and pews from the Jamestown South Methodist Church, when that church disbanded. The original pulpit is still being used. Also, the first Bible property of the church, though showing much use and wear through the years, is still treasured for its spiritual value.

 

In 1919, the original organ was replaced by the present piano. The altar and altar railings were rebuilt in 1954 by men of the church. The Cross was made and presented to the church in 1967 by Rev. Jerry Brinegar, who was then pastor of the church.

 

Since 1872, there have been 50 men recorded as being pastors of the church, appointed by conference, with a number of others, some from other denominations, supplying when a regular pastor was not available. Many student pastors served the Splice Creek church. Services were held every fourth Sunday morning and evening. The students would come from Cenral Methodist College in Fayette, by train, to Wooldridge, Lupus or Sandy Hook.  This depending on where the host of the weekend was best suited to meet them, on horseback or whatever way available. On Monday morning he was again taken back to meet the train to return to his classes at Fayette. Since 1931, there have been 12 District Superintendants and 6 Bishops recorded.

 

Among the earliest members was Mrs. Marion Marshall, whose grandsons, Frank, Lloyd, Oscar and George Marshall are among the present members. The living persons who have been members of the church the longest are: Henry Hampton and his wife, Ora Kenny Hampton. Both united with the church in 1901. Henry Hampton is the grandson of Job Hampton, one of the first trustees. Also, two great grandsons of Job Hampton are now Methodist ministers. They are Arthur Hampton and Wesley Hampton. A former member, Thomas Boone Don Carlos is now an Assembly of God minister. Mrs. Mary Miller Hampton, 92 years old, is the oldest member in age. She transferred her membership from Jamestown to Splice Creek in 1918.

 

 

 

If anyone has information on this church, please contact Alan Sparks.


 

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Last modified: August 02, 2014